'It's important to be honest and fair': Camille 'Kamille' Purcell on the big issues facing hitmakers

'It's important to be honest and fair': Camille 'Kamille' Purcell on the big issues facing hitmakers

In the new issue of Music Week we take an in-depth look at the world of songwriting as the biz prepares to celebrate at the Ivors.

Leading up our coverage – which includes interviews with Mark Ronson and Guy Chambers – is elite hitmaker and rising artist Camille ‘Kamille’ Purcell. Hailed by Music Week’s Songwriter Of 2018 Steve Mac as one of the best songwriters in the world, Purcell’s résumé has already notched up over four billion streams, 11 platinum singles and five UK No.1s for the likes of Little Mix, Clean Bandit and, most recently, Mabel.

For the feature, we join Purcell at her publisher BMG’s London HQ for a wide-ranging conversation covering her transition from life as a London stockbroker to hitmaker, working with her heroes like Rihanna and Timbaland and what songwriters need most from the industry in 2019.

In her interview, Purcell opened up about some of the business lessons she’s learned along the way.
“I’ve learned about being fair,” she told Music Week. “We’ve all been burned a lot when it comes to splits, credits, every songwriter has their share of issues. The most important thing you can be as a songwriter is honest and fair. That’s really important. That will give you such longevity in this industry – when you’re a good person.”

On the crucial topic of remuneration in the streaming age, Purcell stressed the importance of working towards a resolution for songwriters.

 

We’ve all been burned a lot when it comes to splits, credits, every songwriter has their share of issues

Camille Purcell

 

“I just wish things could be fair,” she said. “That’s all I wish. Really, in any industry you want to be paid fairly and have your name on the thing. If you’re an accountant, you wouldn’t do a whole day’s work and then not be paid the right price for it. All industry’s pay should be fair and I hope everything can be resolved because people are getting really upset. That’s my take on it, I think it’s about unity and equality wherever we go. It does make me sad, but I know things will get sorted out.”

She continued: “Don’t be under illusions, if you’re a big hit writer it’s still difficult, you still don’t know when you’re getting paid, you still suffer and don’t know what the hell’s going on. It’s hard for all of us. In no way am I thinking it’s easier on me, I’ve definitely got more experience to know that when you’re starting out, you’re so anxious thinking nothing is going to happen and I know for these writers it will happen. Patience is everything. In the meantime, we just have to support each other and do the right thing.”

You can read the full interview with Purcell in the new edition of Music Week or subscribers can click here.

Photo: Paul Harries

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